Do Not Adjust Your Set, We Have Control

English: Official logo for the ATF
English: Official logo for the ATF (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Okay call me cynical, but as I wrote my last blog-post about the ‘Midnight Shooter‘ something kept nibbling away at the back of my brain. I went to sleep on it with the hopes that this brain-eating problem would make itself known when I woke up in the morning.

It did.

The thing that kept ‘pinging’ my brain was the phrase “Fast and Furious.” Now unless you’ve been under a rock for the past year or on another planet, you’re going to be aware of the ‘scandal’ associated with that phrase. But just in case you missed it, here it is.

In 2011 it was discovered that the ATF  (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives) had been operating a ‘sting’ operation which sold guns to Mexican drug cartels. For years. The ATF’s version of events was that this was done to aid in the identification of said cartel’s and ease the shut-down of the identified drug running organizations.

I cannot begin to imagine who in the world thought this was a good idea.  What kind of sting operation arms criminals?

It now appears that the whole Fast and Furious plan was about helping instigate new and stricter gun control laws. I can get behind the idea of stricter sales procedures for weapons as long as they don’t become too constrictive. The government have to make sure that they don’t go the way of England and make it practically impossible for an honest law-abiding citizen to own a gun.

If you ‘google’ the question how many mass shootings occurred in the last year you will get an array of answers. The highest amount quoted is 20 per year. Now as that source relied on information gleaned from a Russian website, I feel that the numbers might be a little exaggerated. Despite Russia’s new political “freedom” they still are not card carrying members of the “I heart USA” club.

What I am wondering about, is how this latest in the headline grabbing world of mass murder will help support the gun control advocates cause? I will freely admit that the conspiracy nut part of my brain embraces the idea that the ‘news‘ of the Midnight Shooters arsenal  collection via the internet combined with the ‘fact’ that he bought his weapons at four different gun outlets plays very nicely into the hands of the gun control advocates.

In a time period where the United States Government is hell-bent on controlling the world’s internet and the same government’s agencies provide weapons to Mexican drug cartels  in order to force gun law changes and now have unmanned drones that can take a picture of the average American’s navel fluff, is it that huge of a leap to think that this whole ‘midnight massacre’ plays very conveniently for the “Say no to guns brigade?”

We need to be paying very close attention to what is going on here. This whole ‘control’ thing is getting out of hand. Our government is there to protect and by extension act for us, not against us. This “scaremongering” needs to stop. If we keep focussing on stricter gun controls and ignore the constitutional right to bear arms, we could wind up like the UK . A place where juvenile gangs and other criminals have ready access to guns and the average citizen has to practically sell their soul to own a shotgun.

The same citizen who, if he defends his home and family a bit too vigorously will be penalized and imprisoned. That’s what losing the right to bear arms means. It means that you can no longer protect your home or loved ones from the evil that walks the streets.

Yes, what happened in a movie theatre in Aurora, Colorado was vile, horrible and terrifying. So is losing the right to defend yourself.  

Inception (2010): Matrix for the New Millenium **may contain spoilers**

Cover of "Inception"
Cover of Inception

Written and directed by Christopher Nolan Inception is a masterpiece of a movie. It features an all-star cast and has so much chopping and changing of plots and action that you begin to feel like you’re watching a movie version of the game Twister.

Starring in no particular order:

Leonardo DiCaprio

Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Ellen Page

Ken Watanabe

Cillian Murphy

Tom Berenger

Marion Cotillard

Michael Caine

Pete PostlethwaiteDileep RaoTom Hardy, and  Lukas Haas. A pretty impressive group by anyone’s standards.

The budget for this film was 160 million dollars and the box office return was in excess of 825 million dollars making Inception a real blockbuster film with a capital B.

The basic (as basic as you can get in this film) is that Cobb (DiCaprio) is a dream thief. He is in exile from America as he has been accused of murdering his wife and he is unable to see his children in Los Angeles as a result. The irony is that this dream thief dreams constantly of returning home and seeing his kids.

Cobb has been offered a ‘clean slate’ by ruthless businessman Saito (Watanabe), which will allow Cobb to return home and wipe the murder charge from his record. What Saito wants in return is for Cobb to not steal a dream, but to plant an idea which is known as “Inception.”

The target, a business conglomerate, owned by tycoon Maurice Fischer  (Postlethwaite) who is dying and leaving it all to his son Robert (Murphy). Saito wants Cobb to plant the idea through Robert’s dream state that his father really wants him to sell the conglomerate off and make his own fortune.

Cobb’s ‘business’ partner Arthur (Gordon-Levitt) says it is not possible. Cobb maintains that it is. He and his deceased wife Mal (Cotillard) had practised this. Unfortunately it is very dangerous and we learn that this was how Mal died. Although Arthur decides to help Cobb he is not convinced that they can do it safely.

Cobb must now come up with a new powerful dream ‘architect’ because this was Mal’s job before she died. Ariadne (Page) is recruited via Miles (Caine) Cobbs father-in-law. He then gathers the rest of his team; Eames (Hardy) an identity forger, Yusuf (Rao) who controls the sedatives required by the team, Arthur and Saito as the mission observer.

In order for the idea to be planted, the team must go into several dream states, each deeper than the previous one, in order to evade the target’s defences.

And evade they must for Robert has had his brain ‘trained’ by a security company. This training allows his dreaming state to be patrolled by security guards who can spot intruders and terminate them with extreme prejudice. This is not the only hurdle the team have to overcome. It seems that Cobb’s dead wife, Mal, is alive and well in his sub-concious and she will try to sabotage their mission.

The last ‘danger’ the group face is being in the dream world too long. If you go too deep and cannot be brought back, via a drop or your dream self getting killed, you will remain in the dream state forever. You can also become confused as to what is ‘real’ and what is a dream, to help each team member keep track, they each have a personal totem that behaves differently in the dream state. Cobb’s is a top that spins perpetually.

So the  team must go into a dream and then go into another dream and into another dream. Each dream state requires a team member to stay in that level and watch over the remaining members as they go deeper.

Confused yet?

This film looks amazing, you can see where the 160 million went. Nolan masterfully helms the many twists and turns of the verse and at no time does he leave one string dangling. My daughter and I went to see this at the cinema. We both were on the edges of our respective seats through the entire film.

What The Matrix did for cinema combat, Inception does for cinema environment. Two of the film’s set pieces, ‘the exploding room’ and ‘the anti-gravity room’ were real sets. The mountain fortress was real as well, just in miniature so it could be blown up.  CG was used at a minimum to help sell the shots. Nolan created these set pieces by taking a step back in the world of special effects. 

But where CGI was used, it worked beautifully. When Cobb is interviewing Ariadne, the scene begins with the two of them at a Parisian Bistro. They are seated with drinks in front of them. Cobb is explaining how dream architecture works. He then looks at Ariadne and says, “Do you remember how we got here?” When Ariadne starts to respond, items from the ‘busy’ set start exploding. *On a side note here, the scene has so many props in it, that if it were not computer generated it would have set Nolan back a large part of that 160 million.*

After the set explodes, they then start walking the streets. Ariadne starts practicing her architecture and literally bends the streets and buildings, while Cobb explains the rules of the ‘dream verse.’

CGI is used for the world that Mal and Cobb created that resulted in Mal killing herself in the mistaken belief that the created world was the real world that she desperately wanted to go back to. The city in the parallel world is almost Dali-esque in it’s depiction. When Cobb and Ariadne go there to deal with Mal, it is decaying and falling into the ocean. It is like the place is eroding from lack of use and it looks disturbing.

But two of the most impressive scenes that did not rely on CGI were the exploding room at the beginning of the film and in the hotel scene later on.  Using an ‘anti-gravity’ room, which in essence was a ‘room’ that was suspended in mid-air and rotated. The actors were attached to wires in some cases, but for the most part they really were working in ‘free-fall.’

And free-fall is how Nolan sells the film so well. Remember the “dream within a dream within a dream” bit? Well, this tier system that requires a team member to stay behind in each level, starts with the first team member, who actually has everyone else with him but in a dream state, drives a van they are all in off a bridge. Cue the first free-fall. And it has a effect on the next team member who is in the hotel portion of the dream.

The film only had  about 500 visual effects. A very small amount for a film with so many special effects and such a huge budget.

The film moves almost seamlessly between the real world and the dream world. But it does this so often that is almost like a cinematic shell game. By the end of the film you have to decide what was real and what was a dream. What ever you decide is based on your interpretation of the series of events.

When the film ended (prepare yourself for the controversy) two things happened almost simultaneously, we both looked at each other and said, “Blu-ray.” We also immediately started discussing the ending and how we saw it. We weren’t the only ones either.

For the first time in years, I saw a room full of people discussing excitedly the film they had just seen. The room was full of laughing, talking, and arguing people. I really can’t remember the last time I’ve seen an audience act that way after a film.

As we left the cinema, my daughter turned to me and said, “Wow, that was ‘The Matrix of the new millenium.”

I think she’s right. Just like The Matrix, Inception changed the rules and bent the rules it couldn’t change. It went so far outside the box, that the box ceased to exist.

If Inception is not on the list of  films to see before you die, it should be.

Right at the top.