Rowdy Roddy Piper Dead at 61

Rowdy Roddy Piper RIP
Roderick George Toombs, aka Rowdy Roddy Piper has died from cardiac arrest age 61. TMZ.com reported that the wrestler, actor, husband and father of four passed on in his Hollywood home while sleeping. Piper’s representative confirmed the news of Rowdy’s death and told TMZ that he was devastated.

Piper had a long career in the WWE, he was inducted into their Hall of Fame in 2005, and he was one of 50 “villains” to be included in that hallowed hall of distinction. He also worked as an actor and has 123 credits under his name on IMDb, appearing in such cult hits as Hell Comes to Frogtown and the iconic They Live. Both films were released in 1988 and it is the latter film that immediately comes to mind when thinking of the pro wrestler.

The bank scene in They Live, “I have come here to chew bubblegum and kick a** and I’m all out of bubblegum” is considered iconic. The line, spoken by his character Nada in the John Carpenter film is said before he begins shooting down aliens in the crowded bank, was easily the best thing Piper ever said either in or out of the ring. Piper specialized in being brash as part of his act and he was bigger than life.

While he was well known for the WWE, Piper will also be remembered for the two 1988 films, especially his Sam Hell from Hell Comes to Frogtown although it is a toss up between his other role the same year as to which one is a fan favorite. Rowdy Roddy Piper is survived by his wife Kitty and his four children. In 2006, Piper had been diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma but family members have told the press that Roddy was free of the disease at his death.

RIP to Rowdy Roddy Piper, WWE legend and that guy in the bank. As a sign of respect and remembrance here is the clip from the bubblegum scene in They Live.

Dominion: A Bitter Truth (recap and review)

Michael and Gabriel disagree
Last week’s episode of Dominion introduced a new character; Gates (Nic Bishop), Alex found General Riesen (Alan Dale), Michael sacrificed himself for Mallory and rose up afterward, and the big reveal was that Julien is the banished Archangel Lyrae. Last week also saw Gabriel send an angel to bring him the head of Claire Riesen. Dominion in A Bitter Truth follows the events of last week.

This week Alex gets a tour of New Delphi from Julien, which ends badly for the leader, and Noma is “outed” as an angel, Michael joins forces with Gabriel, Gates and Claire Riesen make a good team and David Whele gets motivation from son William as he struggles to save his own life.

Alex is pushing for Julien to honor their agreement and the New Delphi leader tells the Chosen One that it will take a week for the truck to return from Vega. He does not believe that Julien has sent any trucks and points out that the “fleet” of five vehicles have not moved since his arrival. He believes that Julien is hiding something.

David Whele is down on the streets, after being banished by Claire Riesen, and he is having a hard time dealing till William stops by to visit. As he stands arguing with his “late” son, someone shoves a bag over his head.

Gates receives a visit from Claire, he is practicing his pitch while she presses the buzzer for entry. When he finally allows her in (after making her wait for “five minutes,” she complains) he says, “Claire, I wasn’t expecting company today…or ever…really.” A great comic line that pretty much sums up the character of Gates in a sentence.

The MIT genius tells Claire about a baseball memory, he is watching the taped 2004 Red Sox vs Yankees game that his mother took him to as a child as he throws the baseball. He has a memento, a signed baseball card that his mother got for him. Gates tells Claire that he watches the game when he is trying to solve a problem, in this case, it is the unidentified crate that Zoe Holloway was seen carting away from the warehouse.

His story, about his “ma” getting the card signed, “There was no stopping that woman,” seems to show just why he is attracted to Claire. After this short tale, he sees that someone has followed her to his place. Gates initiates total lockdown.

Gabriel is in a snit with Janeck, who never sent the army he asked for. Janeck gets “lippy” and after being taught that “bourbon is whiskey” has his face planted in the hood of his car, several times. He goes to summon the army as Gabriel told him, chastised and a bit wiser after Gabriel’s “no hands” trick.

David has been kidnapped by Zoe and her henchman Jasper. They plan to film his execution. William continues to taunt his father as they prepare to kill him. Pete tries to convince Alex that Julien has more than five trucks in his fleet. General Riesen agrees with Alex and Noma, Julien is hiding something. Pete and Riesen stay behind while the other two search for the New Delphi secret.

Claire and Gates see the angel that Gabriel sent and Michael meets up with his brother to discuss Uriel, Alex, Noma and the fact that Claire Riesen bombed his, Gabriel’s aerie. He tells Michael that Alex is dead and Michael disagrees. Meanwhile the angel tasked with getting Lady Riesen’s head cuts the power to Gates’ lair.

David is read his list of crimes by Zoe while Jasper beats him. William continues to gloat and Whele manages to save himself for a half hour. Gates starts a backup generator for emergency power and the angel goes to the basement. He tries to break through the floor and knocks a shelving unit over onto Gates injuring him.

Julien and General Riesen talk strategy as Alex and Noma find Julien’s secret room. It is filled with an eight-ball army. There are thousands, or more, of the lower angel possessed humans who are frozen and armed. Alex is stunned and says, “This is not a city of merchants, it is a city of monsters.”

Gabriel admits that Alex is alive and he explains that Uriel died because she had no warning. The angel at Gates’ steel door is using his wings to cut through it. Pete has been taken by Julien back at New Delphi, David Whele has survived a little bit longer and William continues to provoke his father.

Gates and Claire electrocute the angel who is using his wings to cut through the metal door, with the generator. The angel is knocked off his feet, but only stays down for a moment. As it gets up, Claire tells Gates that they have “pissed him off.” David continues to plead his case, this time offering up endless food for the revolution. William finally irritates his father enough that he snaps at the specter of his son and tells him to, “Shut up!”

Julien relates a history lesson to Pete, who is tied to a chair, Alex and Noma. He reveals that the eight-ball army is in stasis and that he adds to it. The key that Alex retrieved was crucial to the process and Pete is soon inhabited by another lower angel.

Claire tells Gates to start using that “incredible brain” of his and he responds by kissing her. Then he explains how her father found him back at MIT. Back at New Delphi, Julien has Noma put in the chair and she fights off the lower angel, knocking out Julien, who is shocked to see that she is an angel. She and Alex escape with the amphora.

Michael and Gabriel continue to argue about “Father’s children” and back at Whele’s old studio as Zoe learns that David’s promise of food was genuine, David grabs Jasper’s gun. He also relates his own little history lesson to Zoe and Jasper about how he rose to power. He tells them that he probably killed William and as his son’s image argues with him, David shoots William and he vanishes.

Alex learns, from Noma, what the amphora is capable of. First, however, she reveals that she wants to use it to destroy Julien, the eight-ball army and New Delphi. Meanwhile, David talks Zoe into letting him help to defeat Claire Riesen.

Gates and Claire escape after she has booby trapped his warehouse, capturing the angel in the building, they kill it with the resultant explosion. Outside, Claire takes charge and Gates asks for a moment to take in the fact that all his life’s possessions have been destroyed. “Not all,” says Claire as she hands him the signed baseball card.

Michael and Gabriel agree to join forces and Nomes learns that Julien is a Dyad, half-human/half-higher angel. Julien explains that the amphora can be used to kill not just Gabriel, but Michael and the entire family of archangels. Alex tells him that if he does not use it to defeat Gabriel, Noma will use it to destroy New Delphi and Julien.

The return of Anthony Head, as David Whele, was a welcome addition to events. David’s killing William twice, so to speak, was telling and disturbing, there really is nothing that Whele will not do to take down Claire Riesen. Julien has still not revealed who he really is and the surprising turn of events is that Michael and Gabriel are to team up.

The chemistry between Nic Bishop and Roxanne McKee is still pretty potent and the two are a good match. In the show Gates brings out the best in Claire and she has lost some of that season two harshness. Dominion airs Thursdays on SyFy this is “outside the box” entertainment that may be dark but worth watching.

Scream MTV Small Screen Slasher More Annoying Less Fun

First victim in Scream MTV
In 1996 Wes Craven started the Scream franchise, which to be fair came later, and, giving a great big cheeky nod to Alfred Hitchcock, killed off the film’s star in the first five minutes. The film was Craven’s homage with a tongue-in-cheek delivery to all things “slasher film” since the genre took off in the 1970s. The first film, like the rest, featured a strong female protagonist (or two counting Courtney Cox’s character) an endearing, and bumbling cop and some pretty spot on nods and winks to the genre and a lot of humor. It also featured Roger Jackson, who “appeared” (more accurately he was heard) in every Scream film as “Ghostface.”

The idea of taking the “scream-verse” to the small screen sounds like a great idea on paper, at least it must have to get MTV to get involved, but Scream lacks so much and the small screen slasher is more annoying and less fun than its inspiration. Certainly watching the first four episodes (“for free, then just sign into your MTV app and…”) there are things that work, albeit, barely.

There is a fairly good backstory, but it does feel like a Halloween borrow, giving the mask way more significance than Wes Craven or Kevin Williamson ever did. Certainly the creators of Scream “TV” have taken the idea of cell phone culture to heart. Using the young’s propensity to text rather than call on their cell, it almost negates the use of a “ghostface” voice changer, aka Roger Jackson (who, incidentally was never approached by the makers to work on the new series). Perhaps the most annoying thing about the show is the cheap trick by the program makers of having someone do a pretty underwhelming impression of Jackson on the phone and not having the “real deal.”

Certainly the unwillingness of the program’s makers to payout for the “real” Ghostface spells out all that is wrong with this show. Other problems deal with their use of the Internet, which Craven and Williamson opened the door on in Scream 4. Podcasts, the use of the net to promote instant “fame” (“How do you think people become famous any more? You don’t have to achieve anything. You just gotta have f***ed up-sh*t happen to you.” Jill tells Sidney this, before attempting to take over as hero of the Woodsboro story. Of course the proviso is that one has to film it, upload the footage and reap the rewards.)

Presumably the twist of the last Scream opened the door for this small screen version. The end result is one of overall disappointment. Where is the humor? Gone, like Roger Jackson and Kevin Williamson. The wry, sly, delivery that oversaw all the larger-than-life murders, buckets of blood, quips, plot twists and the likable main protagonists are all missing.

Emma Fitzgerald appears to be the small screen version of Sidney Prescott. She even comes from a broken home, single mom, versus Sid’s single dad scenario. Although mom is a coroner and dad is not dead, at least so far, he just does not live locally anymore. There is no Dewy and Gale Weathers appears to be taken over by a podcast crime aficionado Piper Shay, who lacks the career killer instinct that Weathers had in spades.

Noah Foster, played by John Karna, is a sort of Randy replacement, without the majestic geekiness that Jamie Kennedy infused the character with, although he is a crime buff and not a film one. He is also, a gamer.

The main problem with the small screen Scream is that this tries to be all things to all groups. There is a gay character, who was once bestie’s with Emma, who has yet to really prove to be anywhere near the equal of Sidney, but then who can really compete with Neve Campbell?

Answer?

Not many.

The acting is okay. There are things that stand out. John Karna’s broadcaster style delivery works and his (short-term) girl Riley Marra, played by Brianne Tju, had brilliant chemistry onscreen with Karna and Tju had the best death scene ever. Riley, who stupidly leaves the relative safety of the police station, gets stabbed repeatedly. She climbs to the roof and after slapping one bloody palm on the skylight to get the janitor’s attention, speaks to Noah, via FaceTime. Noah asks where she is, “What can you see,” he asks. As she dies, Riley rolls over to lay on her back facing the night sky. “Your stars,” she whispers and expires.

Not bad.

Unfortunately that two word descriptive fits the show all too well. Rather interestingly, the series seems to be fairly popular. Perhaps these fans are younger audience members who do not get what Craven and Williamson were doing with the big screen original franchise. Thus far the TV version lacks originality, which if would do as it is based upon a successful and beloved film franchise, and it has no humor. It takes itself far too seriously, going for the scare and leaving the humor out of the formula.

Although having said that, Noah does come close to being comic relief, but the working word here is “close.” Oddly, the best thing about the MTV show is the music. It sets scenes beautifully and supports the action very well. This makes sense, it is, after MTV. (Obligatory “Duh” entered here.) Sadly, great music and a kick-ass soundtrack do not a great series make.

One can forgive the lack of a Ghostface voice, since the plot does pretty much rely upon the text function of today’s smart phones, but to then use another actor Mike Vaughn to do a Roger Jackson style delivery is insulting. Not only to Jackson but to fans of the original who so desperately wanted to love this small screen Scream. Granted, it is not really clear if Vaughn is the voice on the phone, he is listed as “killer” rather than phone voice or “ghostface” wannabe. Just one more annoying thing about this show that is much less than the film franchise that inspired it.

Scream airs Tuesdays on MTV. Watch it and “catch up” if you are behind and see what you think. Prepare to be a little underwhelmed, this is a lot less fun than Craven’s films. Fans of horror with humor may want to hold out for Scream Queens on FOX.

Mr Robot: eps.1.5_br4ve-trave1er.asf (rec4p and rev1ew)

Elliot gives Angela a hug in Mr Robot
Last week’s episode ended with Shayla being kidnapped by Vera’s henchmen, Tyrell Wellick overstepped himself badly and the Steel Mountain plan was “killed” by the Dark Army pulling out at the last minute. In eps.1.5_br4ve-trave1er.asf Elliot is derailed and taken away from Mr Robot and fsociety by Vera’s interference. He must get Fernando out of prison or lose Shayla. The drug dealer’s brother and DJ stick to Alderson like glue while he fights to find a solution.

This USA show continues to surprise and show more layers of Elliot, while insuring that each episode cements the premise the Christian Slater’s Mr. Robot is a facet of Alderson’s schizophrenia. For example, in this segment of the show, how does the fsociety leader learn about the issue of Vera, DJ, Isaac and Darlene? When asked, Robot responds that it was Darlene who told him. Doubtful, but it could be so. Still he is ready to sacrifice “his” girl Darlene just as quickly as Shayla. “Let her become a memory,” the leader says and he finishes by telling Elliot that he is playing a zero sum game. It is a lose-lose despite what path Alderson chooses.

Later, when Elliot visits Fernando in the prison, he uses a hard-line approach when dealing with the drug dealer. He explains about hacking Isaac’s phone and gaining control of all his, Vera’s, assets. At one point he orders the thug to sit down, Vera does. This show of “force” is unlike Elliot, who is usually so hesitant.

When he works out how to get Fernando out of prison, Isaac takes Elliot for a walk, one that he is not intended to survive. Alderson then uses the zero sum talk on Vera’s little brother and unlike the result of his conversation with Mr. Robot Isaac is swayed and decides not to pull the trigger. He opts for the best of his lose-lose propositions.

Tyrell Wellick receives a broadside from his new CTO Scott Knowles when he attempts to interrupt the interview process. It turns out that Sharon Knowles told her husband about the bathroom visit during the dinner party. He goes on the attack and does not stop until he breaks the facade of Wellick’s careful composure.

Angela sets out on her own personal attack against E Corp. She pulls information from the data dump and goes to see the lawyer who handled her mother’s case, along with 40 others. The woman tells Angela that essentially she does not have a prayer. Angela replies that Nayar was the only one who returned her call. By the end of her visit with the lawyer, Angela has a new game plan, to “flip” Terry Colby.

As Elliot struggles to hack the prison’s system and get Vera out, Angela stops by to see him. She refuses to leave until he comes down to see her. Darlene is stuck in the apartment till he gets back. Later, Tyrell trashes the glassware in his two-bedroom Chelsea house’s kitchen while his wife calmly eats. She discusses his rage with Wellick and explains why he is so angry. She also points out that Sharon Knowles’ actions have told them what she wants. “What,” asks Tyrell. “To be wanted,” Tyrell’s wife says as she leaves the room.

Elliot realizes that Angela will not leave until he tells her what she wants to hear. Hugging his friend, Elliot tells her that she should follow what she believes is right. Mr Robot is waiting in the stairwell of Alderson’s apartment building and it is here that he gives Elliot the zero sum speech. He says that Shayla was always going to be a victim.

Throughout the episode, Elliot references the fight or flight option. He battles with the decision to do one or the other. However, each time he choses to fight. After Elliot finds his way into the prison’s security system, he has the zero sum talk with Isaac. Using Darlene, Alderson hacks the system via their 4G network.

Vera is released, as promised, and his first move is to have DJ shoot his treacherous little brother. He makes Elliot look at the body and tells him that he can do what ever he wants with his empire, Vera is getting out, becoming a brave wanderer and a spirit.

Before he leaves, Fernando gives Elliot keys to the car he has been traveling in all day. Shayla is in the trunk, dead.

Martin Wallström was, as always, impressive as the plotting exec who felt he had lost control. Carly Chaikin, as Darlene managed to get some of the best lines, the winner being “douche tools” when talking about Vera’s brother and DJ. Portia Doubleday gave us a new prospective on Angela and actually made her even more likable. Last week when she shafted the cheating Ollie, already made her a more empathetic character, and this moved her fully into the likable category.

In terms of just who walked off with the show this week, it was, hands down, Rami Malek. His bounce from panic to forceful assertiveness and back again was impressive. Nothing, however, came near his discovery of the dead Shayla. His entire countenance sold the viewer on the horror of her death before the camera ever moved in for a quick look.

Mr Robot continues to provide a paranoid look at the world of hacking and makes the viewer aware that no place is safe from someone who really wants to mess with your system. It also shows us that mental health issues can be overcome, even without snorting pharmaceuticals, if the desire is strong enough, at least in TV land. It also, reference the start of this week’s episode, manages to merge unreality with every day oddness masquerading as normalcy.

Malek’s voice over performance keeps us with him through the entire story. It shows us his thought process and reassures us that our records and lives are not safe from people like him. It is the perfect marriage between onscreen and off screen portrayal of a character. This actor should be getting a gong, or two, come award time for his compelling performance. Of course the high caliber of his colleagues on the show means that he will most likely have company. Mr Robot airs Wednesdays on USA.

Stitchers: Full Stop Preview & Emma Ishta Talks Season Finale

SALLI RICHARDSON-WHITFIELD, DAMON DAYOUB in Full Stop
Anyone who has been watching Stitchers from episode one will be full fledged fans at this point. The season finale airs on August 4 and is titled Full Stop. Emma Ishta fans can read her exclusive interview for MikesFilmTalk at the bottom of this preview. For those viewers who are not anglophiles or English, “full stop” is Queen’s English for the end of a sentence, aka period. With all the reveals that take place in the series’ season finish the title is not just apt but clever.

The latest episode, Future Tense was, for all intents and purposes, quite light-hearted, a pause for the viewer before the world of Kirsten gets darker and more disturbing. In Full Stop, all roads do indeed lead to Ms. Clark but they do not stop there despite the rather final sounding episode title.

In Full Stop much is revealed about Kirsten and quite a lot is uncovered about her co-worker Dr. Goodkin. Before the final credits roll, an item seen in an earlier stitch shows up before the opening credits and another turns up just before the end credits. Kirsten discovers that she had a “guardian angel,” Camille gets an opportunity to get on a “Fisher” roll (watch the episode, it will make sense) and a chance to practice what Cameron has taught her. The detective goes against Les Turner’s wishes and is later shot. Linus identifies Ed’s key, and he, along with Camille and Kirsten, find out where the key fits.

Detective Fisher, prior to being shot, is told by Turner that discovering who killed Ed Clark is not an option. Reluctantly, Fisher tells the big boss that he will leave the case alone, but Turner is not fooled and he tells Maggie so. Later, Fisher wants to tell Kirsten about Les at a restaurant. Camille and Cameron were invited and Quincy is clearly annoyed.

When Cameron shows up late, and Fisher reacts badly to his presence, Camille drags Kirsten off to the lady’s room. While the two are inside, and Camille continues her Fisher riff, shots are heard and rushing back into the restaurant the girls find three bodies on the floor around their table; Fisher, with blood on his chest, Cameron and a waitress.

The show then has its first stitch, Kirsten in the dead waitress to see who the shooter was, and Cameron, who was injured, decides he needs a backup and he chooses Camille. This goes over like a lead balloon with his best bud Linus and after last week’s Camille storyline (dinner with the parents) their closeness is strained and she is surprised to find Linus reacting so badly.

Camille and Cameron talk about how odd it is that Kirsten does so well at stitching and he reveals that out of all the volunteers who tried only Marta could do it. They then do a stitch simulation, all hands on hands and thumbs touching and Linus comes in. He is not happy although it appears it is less about the “getting physical” aspect and more about Camille not being “qualified.” When Linus questions Cameron about his choice of back-up, Linus is told he lacks “finesse.”

After the waitress stitch, Kirsten and Camille do a composite and Maggie recognizes the features of the shooter, Robert Barbiero (Henry Rollins) who worked with the Stitchers program 20 years previously. The man was close to Clark’s mother and father.

As the episode progresses, Kirsten learns that she was not born with Temporal Dysphasia and she learns a lot more about her father (C. Thomas Howell), mother and Barbiero and some surprising things about her childhood. One unexpected bit of information has to do with a fellow Stitchers team member and an encounter that, apparently, neither of them remember.

Stitchers feels a lot like an ensemble piece, and it is to a degree just that, but everything revolves around Emma Ishta’s Kirsten Clark. As season one has progressed, it began to look as though the young lady was “born to stitch” or made to stitch (the implication being that her destiny had been programmed, for lack of a better word) and all the team were connected to Ms. Clark.

The known connections are: Maggie and Les Turner through Ed Clark, mother, father and the stitchers program and Camille; who as her roommate was hired by Maggie to spy on Kirsten. Thus far, the only immediate team member who does not “have a history” with Kirsten is Linus, as well as new team member Detective Quincy Fisher; he only met Kirsten when Ed Clark died.

As the final episode progresses, Kirsten learns a lot more about her past, most of the information is revealing and disturbing…it is also quite touching. However, for all these lump inducing moments in the episode, the show has turned even darker in the area of the stitchers program. A man killed purposefully, to act as a stitch message machine, and the possibility that Fisher was shot (At Turner’s orders or someone else’s?) to keep him from looking into Ed Clark’s murder both point to an even darker and more disturbing side to the organization.

Just as disturbing is Kirsten’s decision to lie to everyone else on the Stitchers team…except for Cameron.

For all the revelations in the finale, more questions are left unanswered. Whose voice is on that phone? Who was in the car? What was the connection between Barbiero and Kirsten’s mother and father?

This episode has some pretty intense moments as well as some emotional ones (check out the montage of memories toward the end) and the tension is cranked to the limit before those end credits roll.

“Team Stitchers” (the actors, crew, writers and creator Jeff Schechter) have pulled out all stops to give us a finale that crackles with electricity, emotion and suspense. The usual pop culture references are there (and has a RoboCop quote used twice and, oh man, the second time will induce a lump in your throat) and while the comic relief has been pulled back for this episode, it is still in evidence…just.

The Stitchers season finale airs August 4 on ABC Family. Do not miss this event, if you are not a fan yet, start watching now and get caught up. Quality television like this does not happen very often. For those who are fans already, read on to hear Emma Ishta‘s thoughts on the finale.

Emma Ishta as Kirsten Clark in Stitchers
Emma Ishta as Kirsten Clark in Stitchers

WARNING: Some of the questions and answers in the interview come dangerously close to spoiler territory…Just saying.

MikesFilmTalk: Hi Emma, thanks for chatting with MikesFilmTalk about the season finale of Stitchers! First of all, congratulations on getting a second season!

Emma: Thank you, we’re all very excited about the second season and the chance to learn more about Kirsten.

MikesFilmTalk: Well, I just finished watching the episode and…Wow. [Emma laughs] I know you have to be careful about spoilers and things, but right off the bat, I’ve got to ask…How great did it feel for Kirsten to “take charge” in the final stitch of the episode, overriding Maggie…

Emma: I think she felt pretty great about it! There has been a bit of conflict between them from the start. So when she took over it was very satisfying, I think.

MikesFilmTalk: All roads really do lead back to Kirsten…and Cameron…and…seemingly, everyone but Linus. Is he suddenly going to pop up with some sort of connection?

Emma: Wow, that ‘s interesting that you brought that up. I had not realized that there was not a connection between the two…We will, hopefully learn more about everyone else in the second season, Camille and Linus (and their relationship) and all the other team members. We’ll also, hopefully, learn more about Linus. He may still turn out to have a history with Kirsten, you never know.

MikesFilmTalk: Assuming that you are pretty much in the dark about plot arc and reveals…how surprising was it to learn about all those reveals? And what about the Cameron connection?

Emma Ishta: That was surprising. I was sort of aware of all the other “hidden” connections, like the Stitchers program, Maggie and so on, but the Cameron and Kirsten connection was new. In terms of the characters, I don’t believe Kirsten was aware of it and, oddly enough, I don’t think the character of Cameron, was aware of it either. Which puts a different spin on the information and their relationship.

MikesFilmTalk: Now what about Kirsten’s mum…It is obvious, isn’t it, that she is going to be the one talking to Barbiero on the phone and she is in the car…

Emma: That’s an interesting idea, I hadn’t thought of that…

MikesFilmTalk: Well, in a stitch later in the episode, you end up in a memory of a young Barbiero looking at young Kirsten and her mother. The second you touch your mum’s arm in the stitch you wind up right back in the alley with Barbiero…

Emma: Wow…that would be interesting, I really haven’t thought in that direction at all. But you know, in the stitches, Kirsten does really get pulled around a lot and pushed in different directions.

MikesFilmTalk: Agreed. Right, final question. How much fun has it been to play Kirsten?

Emma: I’ve really enjoyed making this journey with her and holding Kirsten’s hand, so to speak, through everything she’s been going through.

MikesFilmTalk: “We’ve enjoyed the journey right along with you! You really brought Kirsten to life. Thanks for the chat!”

Stitchers Full Stop August 4, ABC Family. Be there.